$2M grant to fund 'first hands' communication, medical skills training

$2M grant to fund 'first hands' communication, medical skills training

When a four-wheeler flips or a tornado touches down in a rural area, it's the first hands on the scene - those of a volunteer firefighter, a local police officer, perhaps a state trooper -- that can make the difference between a victim living or dying.

Their ability to use technology to communicate with emergency dispatchers and get professional medical care started is paramount, but for many, training is limited.

A program developed by the University of Mississippi Medical Center to provide that education for first responders isn't just a resource for the state. It's being recognized as a model for the nation.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is boosting UMMC's ongoing First Hands program with a $2 million grant to carry out a rural emergency medical communications demonstration pilot project. The goal: Enhance emergency communications and response capabilities, and help develop a national emergency communications plan by using existing technology.

“It's a marriage that is perfect to promote medical care in rural America and to solve mortality challenges throughout the country,” said Dr. Damon Darsey, UMMC assistant professor of emergency medicine and medical director for the Mississippi Center for Emergency Services.

“Mississippi has one of the most state-of-the-art radio systems in the country. We have an academic medical center that is forward-leaning here and trains responders,” Darsey said. “This allows us to have that radio system combined with the desire of this facility to improve medical care throughout the state.”

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Newest school on UMMC campus named for longtime supporter

The latest chapter in Mississippi's health story has a name - The John D. Bower School of Population Health.

At a ceremony Monday, Sept. 19, university and health-care leaders celebrated the newest health science school at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

“Population health resides at the intersection of clinical care and public health,” said Dr. Bettina Beech, dean of the school. “It is an emerging field that seeks to prevent and treat diseases by keeping people healthy and by addressing the multiple factors that impact the health of individuals and communities.”

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Newest school on UMMC campus named for longtime supporter

$1.9M NIH grant to fund research in children's health at UMMC

$1.9M NIH grant to fund research in children's health at UMMC

The University of Mississippi Medical Center is the recipient of a National Institutes of Health grant for more than $1.9 million that will be used to support research in how environmental factors from conception through early childhood influence the health of children and adolescents.  

The funds, from the NIH Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) program, will be distributed over four years to create a research infrastructure at UMMC, opening the door to increasing pediatric clinical trials in Mississippi, particularly among traditionally underserved populations.

“This will help children's research in Mississippi step up to a new level,” said Dr. Robert Annett, professor of pediatrics and director for research and education at UMMC's Center for the Advancement of Youth. “This will ultimately help pediatric clinical research have a positive impact upon the health of children across the country.”

The grant to UMMC is part of $157 million awarded this year for the seven-year ECHO program, which focuses on the effects of exposure to certain environmental factors - including physical, chemical, biological, social, behavioral, natural and built environments - on child health and development. The studies will target four key pediatric outcomes that have a high public health impact: upper and lower airway health; obesity; pre-, peri- and post-natal outcomes; and neurodevelopment.

Annett and Dr. Rick Barr, Suzan B. Thames professor and chair of pediatrics at UMMC, are the principal investigators in the project, which brings together a team of pediatric clinical researchers to address those four focus areas. 

“Mississippi has many health care challenges, and they can all have a profound impact upon our children,” Barr said. “Through research, we seek to improve children's health from the womb to adulthood, meaning future generations will have the care they need to reach their greatest potential.”

Co-investigators include Annett in neurodevelopment; Dr. Norma Ojeda, associate professor of pediatrics; Dr. Mark Majure, professor of pediatric pulmonology; and Dr. Whitney Herring, an assistant professor of pediatrics specializing in childhood obesity.

Advisory committees for the effort include, within UMMC, Dr. Richard Summers, associate vice chancellor for research; Dr. Bettina Beech, dean of the John D. Bower School of Population Health; Dr. Michael Griswold, director of the Center of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics; Dr. Dan Jones, director of clinical and population sciences for the Mississippi Center for Obesity Research; Dr. Joshua Mann, Preventative Medicine chair; Dr. Gailen Marshall, Allergy and Immunology chair; Jane Reckelhoff, Women's Health Research Center director; and Dr. James Shwayder, chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

External advisors include Dr. Mary Currier, Mississippi State Health officer; David Dzielak, Mississippi Division of Medicaid executive director; Theresa Hanna, Center for Mississippi Health Policy CEO; Dr. Juantina Johnson, Choctaw Health Center chief medical officer; Dr. Joe Olmi, University of Southern Mississippi psychology chair; Linda Southward, Mississippi Health Policy Research Center research scientist; and Dr. David Kimberlin, chair of pediatric diseases at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

“We are bringing together the best minds and are embracing experts from around the state,” said Annett, noting that UMMC will also be collaborating with other institutions to share data and findings.

ECHO will also create a pediatric clinical trials network, leveraging existing infrastructure to address gaps in access to health care for rural children. Children's of Mississippi pediatric clinics around the state would be a part of that system, helping connect clinical trials with children and families, Annett said. Children's of Mississippi is an umbrella organization that includes Batson Children's Hospital and all UMMC pediatric care.

The program seeks to promote best practices for children's health. “Every baby should have the best opportunity to remain healthy and thrive throughout childhood,” said NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins in an announcement this morning.  “ECHO will help us better understand the factors that contribute to optimal health in children.”

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New medicine, psychiatry, pharmacy faculty swell ranks

The Medical Center is proud to announce the following additions to its faculty and leadership staff.

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New medicine, psychiatry, pharmacy faculty swell ranks
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