UMMC access to Medicaid patient health records enhances care

UMMC access to Medicaid patient health records enhances care

The University of Mississippi Medical Center is closing in on one million patient health records exchanged with the state Division of Medicaid in a new effort that allows caregivers to make better-informed decisions by quickly reviewing a patient's expanded medical history.

Medicaid earlier this year worked with MedeAnalytics, a national health-care data analysis vendor, and Epic, the electronic medical records system used by UMMC, to take Medicaid claims data and translate it into clinical data for use at the Medical Center, the state's largest provider of care to Medicaid patients. The exchange makes for a better database defining a patient's health.

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Twice-weekly eCV moves to holiday schedule

Beginning today, eCV, the Medical Center's twice-weekly e-newsletter, will move to a Thursday-only publication schedule for the duration of the holiday season.

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Twice-weekly eCV moves to holiday schedule

Sex, drugs and brains: probing the origins of addiction

Sex, drugs and brains: probing the origins of addiction

Absence makes the heart grow fonder, but it also makes the brain grow vulnerable.

In the study featured in the September 21 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, UMMC researchers show how removing their mates may make rats more susceptible to drug abuse.

It's the latest published finding from the lab of Dr. Lique Coolen, who studies the neurological basis of behavior, particularly as it relates to drugs of abuse.

“Some people try drugs once or twice and they have no problems. Others try drugs once or twice and they become addicted,” said Coolen, professor of physiology and biophysics and the paper's senior author.

While there are several factors that may determine who is most at-risk for drug abuse in humans, strong social networks appear to have a protective effect, Coolen says. The more rewarding relationships a person has - family, friendships and a spouse - the better the buffer. The goal of the study was to learn what happens in the brain when that buffer breaks down.

While “rats don't have friends” in the manner humans do, Coolen said, they do have another immensely rewarding social behavior: sex.

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Nephrology fellow, pathology resident join UMMC faculty

The Medical Center is proud to announce the following additions to its faculty and leadership staff.

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Nephrology fellow, pathology resident join UMMC faculty
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