For students of psychiatry, it’s drive time

For students of psychiatry, it’s drive time

Normally, medical students taking psychiatry courses here have been treated like passengers: They were driven to their destinations.

Now, with the July launch of a new education program, they'll be taking the wheel.

Helping to put them in the driver's seat is Dr. Scott Rodgers, chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, where the traditional passive learning vehicle is being traded in for a more active, cutting-edge model.

This shift, which will extend also to psychiatry residents as early as next year, relies less on lectures in favor of an online learning recipe of podcasts, video presentations of patient interviews, and pre- and post-self-assessment quizzes.

"We're modernizing the way we teach and train psychiatrists," said Rodgers, chair of the department since December.

"With lectures, some students tend not to pay close attention, and they leave without understanding what they need to know.

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Hearing today can be gone tomorrow

Mississippians love their personal listening devices - be it a cell phone in hand, a tablet or computer, or a digital music player - and the earbuds that blast the beat directly into their heads.

But with a maximum volume that can reach 110 decibels, such devices can cause irreversible hearing damage with lifelong repercussions, experts at the University of Mississippi Medical Center say. Ditto for single loud bursts of sound from other sources, such as a gunshot, or prolonged exposure to other loud noise.

Noise levels are measured in decibels. According to the American Speech-Language Hearing Association, sounds louder than 85 decibels have potential to cause permanent hearing loss, whether it's a single loud blast or prolonged exposure.

Firearms or a jet engine can produce 150 decibels or greater, as can fireworks. An ambulance's siren is 120 decibels; the volume at concerts and music festivals reaches about 110 decibels, the National Institutes of Health says. An exposure over 85 decibels can damage hair cells, or sensory receptors, in the inner ear. 

"One loud, intense noise can cause damage, and that damage is permanent," said Dr. Christopher Spankovich, a UMMC audiologist and associate professor of otolaryngology and communicative sciences. "But, prevention is key. We can reduce risk by limiting exposure to loud sounds, maintaining safe distances, and using hearing protection devices."

One example: "When you're shooting a gun, it can be a brief exposure - three milliseconds - but very intense," Spankovich said.

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Hearing today can be gone tomorrow

People of the U: Troy Bunn

People of the U: Troy Bunn

Troy Bunn has brought up pigeons who take off from Illinois right at sunrise and make it to his Florence home in time for 5 p.m. dinner.

That's about 511 miles in a day, barring inclement weather or predators such as hungry hawks.

Since he was a kid growing up in south Jackson, the University of Mississippi Medical Center employee has raised - and raced - pigeons. Bunn starts with very young birds fresh out of the nest and trains them to come home from five miles out, then 10, then 50 or 60. Their enticement to return to their owner is good feed.

"Their first race will be a 100-mile race. They graduate up to 200, 250, 300, and when they're a year old, they're not considered young birds," explained Bunn, who works for physical facilities. "The first old bird race is about 200 miles, and then it goes up to 500 miles."

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UMMC staff receive service recognition

The Medical Center is proud to acknowledge those employees who will celebrate service anniversaries this week:

50 Years

Frankie Gaines, phlebotomy supervisor, Adult Hematology Lab

25 Years

Beverly Brown, medical technologist, Adult Hematology Lab

20 Years

Kimberly Bryant, inpatient nurse, Winfred L. Wiser Hospital for Women and Infants (3 MBU)

Ida Fowler, anesthesia technician supervisor, Anesthesia

Doris Nowell, information clerk, Biomedical Illustration Services

10 Years

Jenny Walker, administrative assistant, Finance

5 Years

Dr. Mohammad A. Ali, assistant professor of radiology

Jesse Austin, biomedical engineering technician, Inpatient Dialysis

Betty Bain, inpatient nurse, Medical Surgical Float

Linda Butler, inpatient nurse, University Hospital (4 North)

Stephanie Christian, physical therapist, University Physicians Pavilion (Physical Therapy)

Sandra Donald, unit secretary, 2 MICU

Alan Dukes, pharmacist, Pharmacy

Dr. Fan Fan, instructor in pharmacology and toxicology

Dr. Maxime Freire, assistant professor of radiology

Kurt Gruneberg, IT clinical solutions strategist, Information Systems

Dr. Heather A. Hancock, assistant professor of ophthalmology

Robyn Herring, education administrator, School of Medicine (Academic Affairs)

Brenda Hope, cardiovascular stepdown nurse, Batson Children's Hospital (5C)

Connie Lee, inpatient nurse, University Hospital (Surgical Suite)

Sarah Little, cardiovascular stepdown nurse, Batson Children's Hospital (5C)

Erica McCullum, inpatient nurse, University Hospital (5 North)

Terese Myers, medical assistant, University Physicians (Lakeland Otolaryngology)

Shalaundrea Rachal, administrative assistant, School of Medicine (Neurology)

Kala Richardson, medical office assistant, University Physicians (Neurology Administration)

Annette Russell, inpatient nurse, University Hospital (4 North)

Donald Smith, technician, Environmental Services

Martha Smith, medical office assistant, University Physicians (Lakeland otolaryngology)

Rochelle Stepro, dental hygienist, School of Dentistry (Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Pathology)

David Strong, flight/transport nurse, Helicopter Transport

Gabriel Thomas, EKG technician, University Hospital (Respiratory Therapy)

Juan Tucker, chief perfusionist, School of Medicine (Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery)

Brandon Wallen, IT support analyst, Information Systems

Shelvalian Ware, field support manager, Information Systems

Aarolyn Williams, respiratory therapist, University Hospital (Respiratory Therapy)

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UMMC staff receive service recognition

Physiologist to discuss CVA abnormalities; pharmacologist to touch on neurological disorders

Physiologist to discuss CVA abnormalities; pharmacologist to touch on neurological disorders

A number of interesting events is scheduled for the upcoming week at the Medical Center.

 

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Pathologist takes quality prize; AMA honors M.D.-Ph.D. student

An associate professor of pathology cops top quality prize, while an M.D.-Ph.D. student receives a national honor from a leading medical association.

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Pathologist takes quality prize; AMA honors M.D.-Ph.D. student
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