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Heart Study - Hearing Ancillary Study

Hearing loss, tinnitus, and balance dysfunction are common age-related issues. However, cohort studies of hearing have been primarily limited to Caucasian populations. The Jackson Heart Study (JHS) is a longitudinal cohort study of 5,301 African Americans living in the metropolitan Jackson, MS area with a focus on cardiovascular/cardiometabolic health. The JHS Hearing Ancillary Study was implemented to measure the prevalence of hearing, tinnitus, and balance outcomes and relationship to predictor variables. Hearing thresholds were measured with standardized protocols using pure-tone air and bone-conduction audiometry in a sound-treated booth.  The examination also included otoscopic evaluation, tympanometry, speech audiometry, and tests of central auditory processing.  Questionnaires on hearing-related health, noise exposure, tinnitus, self-perceived hearing handicap, and balance were completed.  Of the total 5,301 JHS participants, nearly 2,000 individuals participated in the JHS-HS, with 1,314 (24.7%) participants meeting inclusion criteria.

We are currently in the process of analyzing our data and preparing a grant to examine longitudinal outcomes. For information on collaboration or data access, contact cspankovich@umc.edu

Publications from the JHS-Ancillary Hearing Study

  • Haas PJ, Bishop CE, Gao Y, Griswold ME, Schweinfurth, JM (2016). Relationships among measures of physical activity and hearing in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study, Laryngoscope, 126 (10), 890-899. PMID 26928239
  • Sorrel JE, Bishop CE, Spankovich C, Su D, Valle K, Seals S, Schweinfurth (2017). Relationship of stroke risk and hearing loss in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study, Laryngoscope, epub. PMID 28990660
  • House L, Bishop CE, Spankovich C, Su D, Valle K, Schweinfurth (2017). Tinnitus and its risk factors in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study, Laryngoscope, epub. PMID 29193110