Faculty

Click the links below to find more information:


Telehealth GroundbreakingZippity Doo Dah gives to BCHJackson Free ClinicSanderson Farms
  • Kim L. Gratz, PhD

     gratz, kim.jpg

    Professor
    Director, Personality Disorders Research
    Director, Dialectical Behavior Therapy Clinic
    Director, Division of Gender, Sexuality, and Health

    Office: (601) 815-6450
    E-mail: klgratz@umc.edu

    Education

    • BA - Gender Social Psychology, Tulane University, 1996
    • MA - Clinical Psychology, University of Massachusetts Boston, 2000
    • PhD - Clinical Psychology, University of Massachusetts Boston, 2003

    Background

    • Clinical psychology internship, McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School, 2002-2003
    • Clinical and Research Fellow, Center for the Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder, McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School, 2003-2004
    • Assistant Research Psychologist, Center for the Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder, McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School, 2004-2005
    • Research Assistant Professor, Clinical Psychology Program and Director of Personality Disorders Division, Center for Addictions, Personality, and Emotion Research, University of Maryland, 2005-2008
    • Assistant Professor, Division of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2008-2010
    • Associate Professor, Division of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2010-2014
    • Professor with Tenure, Division of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2014-present


    Dr. Gratz is a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at UMMC, where she serves as Director of Personality Disorders Research and director of the Dialectical Behavior Therapy Clinic. She received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Massachusetts Boston in 2003, following completion of her pre-doctoral internship training (with an emphasis on the treatment of borderline personality disorder) at McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School. After being awarded the Psychosocial Fellowship from McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School in July 2003, she served as a Clinical and Research Fellow in the Center for the Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder at McLean Hospital from 2003-04, and an Assistant Research Psychologist in this program from 2004-05. In 2005, Dr. Gratz joined the Clinical Psychology Program at the University of Maryland (where she served as Director of the Personality Disorders Division of the Center for Addictions, Personality and Emotion Research for three years), and was awarded the Young Investigator’s Award of the National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder (NEA-BPD).

    Research Interests

    Dr. Gratz's clinical and research interests focus on the role of emotion dysregulation, or maladaptive ways of responding to emotions, in borderline personality disorder (BPD), self-injury, and other risky behaviors (including suicidal behaviors, substance misuse, and risky sexual behaviors). In particular, her research focuses on understanding the nature and consequences of emotional dysregulation and avoidance in these conditions (through the use of novel behavioral/experimental paradigms), and applying this understanding to the development of more effective treatments. She is also interested in disseminating these treatments to community clinicians and training clinicians in delivering these treatments.

     

    Recent projects include: examining the efficacy and underlying mechanisms of  an acceptance-based, emotion regulation group therapy (ERGT) for self-injury among women with borderline personality pathology; examining the effectiveness of this treatment in a large-scale nationwide study in Sweden; a laboratory-based study of BPD-relevant personality traits and emotion regulation capacity among women and their infants; a longitudinal study using a novel cognitive task to examine emotional relief/regulation as a prospective predictor of self-injury among young adults with and without BPD; development of a structured interview for assessing DSM-5 NSSID; an examination of the personality traits and underlying processes associated with borderline personality symptoms in youth; and a longitudinal laboratory-based investigation of emotion regulation as a prospective predictor of sexual revictimization and its proximal risk factors.

     

    Dr. Gratz currently serves as Co-Principal Investigator or Co-Investigator on 5 federal grants examining emotion dysregulation, BPD, substance use, and/or mother-child relationships, including a large operating grant funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, an R01 funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, an R15 funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, an R21 funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, and an R21 funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

     

    For more information about Dr. Gratz's research or her DBT Clinic, please visit the Personality and Emotion Research and Treatment Laboratory webpage.