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  • Sidney A. Coleman Post-Sophomore Medical Student Pathology Fellowship

    The Pathology Department at the University of Mississippi Medical Center offers a post-sophomore fellowship position for medical students who have completed at least their second year of medical school. The program is designed both for students who show a special interest in pathology as a career and students who wish to specialize in fields that are strongly complemented by additional training in pathology (surgery, oncology, OB/GYN, etc).

    The student will receive an in-depth experience in surgical pathology, cytopathology, clinical pathology and autopsy. Rotations for research projects are also available. The goal of the program is to promote pathology as a career and to strengthen pathologists’ roles in the clinical care team.

    Post-sophomore fellows receive a stipend of $24,000 for the year, plus standard UMMC benefits, and a $1,000 educational allowance.

    Applicants should send their current curriculum vitae, medical school transcript and statement of interest to:

    • M. Ayman Asfour, MD 
              Director of Post-Sophomore Fellowship Program 
              Department of Pathology 
              University of Mississippi Medical Center 
              2500 N. State St. 
              Jackson, MS 39216 
              E-mail: MAAsfour@umc.edu

     

    Biography of Sidney A. Coleman, Jr., M.D.

    Dr. Sidney A. Coleman Jr. was born in Kosciusko, MS, in 1924, into a long-established Southern family with roots dating back more than a century.

    Dr. Sidney A. Coleman, Jr.
    Dr. Sidney A. Coleman, Jr.

    He received secondary education in the local schools, graduating from Kosciusko High School in the early 1940s, just as the United States was becoming embroiled in World War II. Like his classmates, Sidney went directly from high school graduation into the military and served as a Medical Corpsman in the European Theatre of Operations throughout the War.

    On his return home, he entered Tulane University in New Orleans as an undergraduate and continued on after completing college to Tulane Medical School, where he received the MD degree. After serving an internship at Baptist Hospital in Fort Worth, TX, Dr. Coleman entered the Pathology Residency Program at the University of Tennessee Medical Center in Memphis in the Institute of Pathology under the direction of Dr. Douglas H. Sprunt, Chair.

    After completing his residency in both Anatomic and Clinical Pathology and certification by the American Board of Pathology, Sidney was hired as an instructor in that department, where he rose through the academic ranks to full professor of Pathology and later served as acting chair. During his long tenure at the University of Tennessee Medical Center, Sidney worked closely with Dr. Cyrus C. Erickson, long-time deputy chair and, later, interim chair of the department who was one of the pioneers in the developing field of cytopathology after the demonstration by Dr. Georgios Papanicolaou of staining cytologic specimens for the diagnosis of cervical cancer.

    Sidney was one of the early or founding members of the American Society of Cytopathology and served as an officer at different levels, but declined the presidency.

    After 38 years at the University of Tennessee, Dr. Coleman decided to return to his home state and took a position as professor of Pathology in the University of Mississippi Medical Center Department of Pathology where he remained for a number of years, lending valuable counsel to surgical pathologists and cytopathologists and continued his lifelong interest in OB-GYN pathology.

    With advancing age and increasing health concerns, Dr. Coleman retired in 2007 and returned to his hometown of Kosciusko for his remaining years. After several years at the Mississippi State Veterans Home in Kosciusko, Dr. Coleman died peacefully and was interred in the local cemetery alongside his family and ancestors.

    He made many meaningful contributions to this Pathology Department, inspiring many of the residents with whom he enjoyed working in addition to his long tenure and valuable accomplishments in advancing pathology training at the University of Tennessee Medical Center, where he was always a favorite among students of medicine. Dr. Coleman is remembered with admiration and affection in the places where he spent his life’s work.

    A lifelong enthusiast for classical music, he had many “music friends” on our faculty, the University of Tennessee Medical Center faculty and in the community.

    He is remembered as a consummate pathologist, inspiring teacher and advocate for excellence in the practice of medicine.

    Contributed by Julius Cruse, MD, PhD
    Distinguished Guyton Professor
    UMMC Professor of Pathology