Radiologic Sciences


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  • Course Descriptions

    • RAD 300. Concepts of Radiologic Sciences. This course provides an overview of the foundations in radiography involving the practitioner's role in the health care delivery system. Principles, practices, and policies of the health care organization(s) will be examined and discussed in addition to the professional responsibilities and medical language of the radiographer. (2 semester hours) (2-0-0)
    • RAD 306. Radiographic Procedures I. This course will provide a knowledge base necessary to perform standard radiographic procedures. Content includes human structure and function; general anatomy of the human body including body planes, surface landmarks, body habitus, and general bone features; and radiographic anatomy and positioning of the chest, abdomen, and upper and lower extremities. Laboratory experience will be used to complement the didactic portion. (3 semester hours) (2-1-0)
    • RAD 312. Radiation Protection. This course will present basic theories and principles related to the safe utilization of diagnostic radiographic equipment in a clinical setting. The student applies the theories and principles of safe radiation exposure. (2 semester hours) (2-0-0)
    • RAD 318. Principles of Image Formation I. This course will present factors that govern and influence the production and recording of radiologic images. Content includes the importance of minimum imaging standards, discussion of a problem-solving technique for image evaluation, and the factors affecting image quality. Laboratory experience will be used to complement the didactic portion. (3 semester hours) (2-1-0)
    • RAD 324. Age Specific Patient Care. This course will present patient care theory and techniques for a diverse patient population. Content includes age appropriate interpersonal communication, human diversity, patient transfer and immobilization techniques, vital sign monitoring, sterile and aseptic technique, infection control, and medical emergencies. (2 semester hours) (2-0-0)
    • RAD 330. Radiologic Physics. This course will present qualitative and quantitative concepts of radiation physics pertaining to medical applications in radiology; atomic and nuclear structure; properties of radiation; x-ray production; artificial production; photon interactions in matter; and attenuation processes. (3 semester hours) (3-0-0)
    • RAD 336. Radiobiology. This course will present the qualitative and quantitative concepts of radiobiology pertaining to genetic and somatic effects of ionizing radiation and the mechanisms of interaction from subcellular level to organism. (2 semester hours) (2-0-0)
    • RAD 342. Research Methods. This course provides an overview of research design methodology in radiologic sciences. Emphasis is on data collection, analysis, interpretation and effective communication of research via written and oral presentations. (2 semester hours) (2-0-0)
    • RAD 348. Radiographic Procedures II. This course is a continuation of RAD 306. Content includes the radiographic anatomy and positioning of the shoulder and pelvic girdles, as well as contrast studies of the digestive system. Laboratory experience will be used to complement the didactic portion. (3 semester hours) (2-1-0)
    • RAD 350. Principles of Image Formation II. This course is a continuation of RAD 318. Content includes imaging accessories, technique charts, image receptors, image processing, sensitometry, and criterion for image evaluation. Laboratory experience will be used to complement the didactic portion. (3 semester hours) (2-1-0)
    • RAD 354. Clinical Practicum I. Supervised clinical practice experience designed for sequential development, application, critical analysis, integration, synthesis, and evaluation of concepts and theories in the performance of radiologic procedures. Content includes patient assessment; radiographic examinations of extremities (upper and lower) and girdles, chest, thorax, abdomen, vertebral column, urinary system, and gastrointestinal system; radiologic imaging critique; concepts of team practice and patient-centered clinical practice; total quality management; and professional development. (2 semester hours) (0-0-2)
    • RAD 360. Clinical Practicum II. This course is a continuation of RAD 354. Supervised clinical practice experience designed for sequential development, application, critical analysis, integration, synthesis, and evaluation of concepts and theories in the performance of radiologic procedures. Content includes patient assessment; radiographic examinations of extremities (upper and lower) and girdles, chest, thorax, abdomen, vertebral column, urinary system, and gastrointestinal system; radiologic imaging critique; concepts of team practice and patient-centered clinical practice; total quality management; and professional development. (2 semester hours) (0-0-2)
    • RAD 400. Legal and Ethical Issues in Imaging Sciences. A study of legal and ethical issues in imaging sciences. Topics include ethical theories, end of life care, living wills, confidentiality, risk management and quality review, HIPAA, and implementation of the electronic health record. (3 semester hours) (3-0-0)
    • RAD 406. Radiographic Procedures III. This course is a continuation of RAD 348. Content includes the radiographic anatomy and positioning of the vertebral column, bony thorax, and urological studies. Laboratory experience will be used to complement the didactic portion. (3 semester hours) (2-1-0)
    • RAD 412. Advanced Medical Imaging Science. This course will present a study of the advanced physical principles of diagnostic radiology. Topics include image intensification, specialized radiographic units, and quality control of radiographic equipment and accessories. (3 semester hours) (3-0-0)
    • RAD 418. Digital Image Acquisition and Display. This course will explore the components, principles and operations of digital imaging systems. Factors that impact image acquisition, display, archiving and retrieval are discussed. Principles of digital imaging quality assurance and maintenance are presented. (3 semester hours) (3-0-0)
    • RAD 424. Principles of Computed Tomography. This course explores the basic physical and technical principles of computed tomography (CT) imaging. Content includes computed tomography generations, components, operations, and imaging processes with an emphasis on sectional anatomy as compared to planar anatomy as seen in computed tomography. (2 semester hours) (2-0-0)
    • RAD 430. Pharmacology and Drug Administration. This course is an overview of pharmacologic principles and practices in patient care with emphasis on imaging procedures. Topics include biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug classifications, radiopharmaceuticals, venipuncture, routes of drug administration, emergency medications, and cardiac monitoring. (2 semester hours) (2-0-0)
    • RAD 436. Radiographic Pathology. This course introduces theories of disease causation and the pathophysiologic disorders that compromise healthy systems. Content includes etiology, pathophysiologic responses, clinical manifestations, radiographic appearance, and management of alterations in body systems. (3 semester hours) (3-0-0)
    • RAD 448. Radiographic Procedures IV. This course is a continuation of RAD 406. Content includes the radiographic anatomy and positioning of the cranium, as well as the use of advanced radiographic procedures pertaining to the different systems of the body and those requiring special techniques. Laboratory experience will be used to complement the didactic portion. (3 semester hours) (2-1-0)
    • RAD 451. Management Issues in Diagnostic Health Care. This course is a study of managerial roles and functions in health care organizations with emphasis in diagnostic imaging. Content includes connective processes, planning, organizing, staffing, influencing, controlling, and labor relations. Provides a foundation of managerial thoughts and processes which lead to organizational success and maximum productivity. (3 semester hours) (3-0-0).
    • RAD 454. Clinical Practicum III. This course is a continuation of RAD 360. Supervised clinical practice experience designed for sequential development, application, critical analysis, integration, synthesis, and evaluation of concepts and theories in the performance of radiologic procedures. Content includes patient assessment; radiographic examinations of extremities (upper and lower) and girdles, chest, thorax, abdomen, vertebral column, urinary system, and gastrointestinal system; radiologic imaging critique; concepts of team practice and patient-centered clinical practice; total quality management; and professional development. (5 semester hours) (0-0-5)
    • RAD 460. Clinical Practicum IV. This course is a continuation of RAD 454. Supervised clinical practice experience designed for sequential development, application, critical analysis, integration, synthesis, and evaluation of concepts and theories in the performance of radiologic procedures. Content includes patient assessment; radiographic examinations of extremities (upper and lower) and girdles, chest, thorax, abdomen, vertebral column, urinary system, and gastrointestinal system; radiologic imaging critique; concepts of team practice and patient-centered clinical practice; total quality management; and professional development. (3 semester hours) (0-0-3)
    • RAD 466. Clinical Practicum V. This course is a continuation of RAD 460. Supervised clinical practice experience designed for sequential development, application, critical analysis, integration, synthesis, and evaluation of concepts and theories in the performance of radiologic procedures. Content includes patient assessment; radiographic examinations of extremities (upper and lower) and girdles, chest, thorax, abdomen, vertebral column, urinary system, and gastrointestinal system; radiologic imaging critique; concepts of team practice and patient-centered clinical practice; total quality management; and professional development. (3 semester hours) (0-0-3)
    • RAD 472. Seminar I. This course provides an overview of various topics in radiologic sciences. (1 semester hour) (1-0-0)
    • RAD 475. Seminar II. This course provides an overview of various topics in radiologic sciences. ( 1 semester hour) ( 1-0-0)
    • RAD 490. Special Topics. Interdisciplinary elective. Content varies. May be repeated for credit. (1 to 4 semester hours) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.